Disease data 

 

Acta Otolaryngol. 1999;119(8):925-33.

Heavy snorer's disease: a progressive local neuropathy.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10728936  Friberg D1

 

Snoring and risk of cardiovascular disease in women

Frank B Hu, Walter C Willett, JoAnn E Manson, Graham A Colditz, Eric B Rimm, Frank E Speizer, Charles H Hennekens and Meir J Stampfer

http://www.onlinejacc.org/content/35/2/308 

 

Chest. 1992 Nov;102(5):1371-6.

Cardiovascular risk factors in snorers. A cross-sectional study of 3,323 men aged 54 to 74 years: the Copenhagen Male Study.

Jennum P1, Hein HO, Suadicani P, Gyntelberg F.

https://journal.chestnet.org/article/S0012-3692(16)59058-8/pdf 

 

Arch Iran Med. 2007 Apr;10(2):215-26.

Snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

Madani M1.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17367226

 

Neurology. 1992 Jul;42(7 Suppl 6):75-81; discussion 82.

Snoring, sleep apnea syndrome, and stroke.

Palomäki H1, Partinen M, Erkinjuntti T, Kaste M.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1630643 

 

Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1987 Jan 3;294(6563):16-9.

Snoring as a risk factor for ischaemic heart disease and stroke in men.

Koskenvuo M, Kaprio J, Telakivi T, Partinen M, Heikkilä K, Sarna S.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3101779

 

Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2012 Jul 15; 186(2): 190–194.

Published online 2012 Jul 15. doi: 10.1164/rccm.201201-0130OC

PMCID: PMC3406081

PMID: 22610391

Sleep-disordered Breathing and Cancer Mortality

Results from the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study

  1. Javier Nieto,1 Paul E. Peppard,1 Terry Young,1 Laurel Finn,1 Khin Mae Hla,1,2 andRamon Farré3

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3406081/ 

Clinical data and performance

 

3.1 THE COPENHAGEN STUDY: 

The study from 1989 carried out at the Department of neurology of the Danish University State Hospital, of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet, reports a significant improvement in self or bed-partner reported snoring, and a significant improvement in sleep quality, daytime tiredness and sleepiness were observed by using Asonor. Out of the 224 registered test persons, 218 male, every-night snorers, age 50-65, participated in an open, acceptance study with a daily use of 1.2 mg Asonor. All participants were instructed to use Asonor freely. After 6 months 67.9% were still using Asonor. A significant improvement, 77% with daily use, in self or bed-partner reported snoring, and a significant improvement in sleep quality, daytime tiredness and sleepiness was observed compared to baseline values. In the double blind controlled study, 50 every-night male snorers, age 50-65 were included. All were using a nasal application of 1.2 mg Asonor with Polysorbate 80 every night or a control preparation which was of a chemical exact the same composition, Asonor without P-80. In the double blind controlled study microphone sensors were used and a significant improvement was as well found in self- and bed partner reported snoring, tiredness, sleepiness and in sleep quality the test period compared to baseline values. No significant differences were found between the two groups, neither in the use of medication, in self reported snoring, in bed-partner reported snoring, in sleep quality or in daytime symptoms: tiredness and sleepiness. The study shows, that nasal installation of the Asonor solution – with or without Polysorbate 80 - improves snoring and furthermore no serious side effects were observed. The solution was delivered by Boehringer Ingelheim (Germany) 

3.2 THE LONDON STUDY: J.G. Widdicombe and A. Davies from Dept of Physiology, St George's Hospital Medical School, London, UK. Report in this London study shows, that the sound produced by continuous flow through the upper airways was decreased by Sonarex (Asonor), but increased by saline. Thus, both Sonarex and saline decrease upper airways resistance, but Sonarex also reduces the sound of snoring and the resistance and sound of continuous airflow through the upper airways. In the study J.G. Widdicombe and A. Davies measured upper airways resistance from the trachea and from the pharynx to the atmosphere, EMG of the genioglossus muscle and the sound of snoring, in anaesthetized greyhounds, breathing spontaneously through the upper airways. J.G. Widdicombe and A. Davies says that using extracorporeally produced continuous flow we determined flow/pressure curves for the upper airways and resistances from the trachea and from the pharynx. We tested the TANNERMEDICO A/S DTU SCIENCE PARK . AGERN ALLÈ 3 · DK-2970 HORSHOLM · PHONE +45 70204093 · FAX +45 70204094 · EMAIL: INFO@TANNERMEDICO.COM VAT.NO.DK28695780 effects of 0.9% saline and of Sonarex (a proprietary mixture containing sodium chloride, glycerol and polysorbate 80). Both saline and Sonarex decreased upper airways resistance, but the latter did so more consistently. With Sonarex, genioglossus activity increased and the sound of snoring decreased. Flow/pressure curves 5-20 min after Sonarex showed a decrease in upper airways resistance and a smoother curve, whereas those with saline showed an increase in resistance. The sound produced by continuous flow through the upper airways was decreased by Sonarex but increased by saline. Thus, both Sonarex and saline decrease upper airways resistance, but Sonarex also reduces the sound of snoring and the resistance and sound of continuous airflow through the upper airways. 

3.3 CONCLUSION: The Copenhagen and London studies show that Asonor reduces snoring by lubricating and softening the mucous membranes in the throat and decreases the upper airways resistance. The intended purpose of Asonor is to reduce or completely eradicate heavy snoring, with the view of reducing the occurrence of obstructive sleep apnea. The conclusion is that the performance data from the London and Copenhagen studies support the intended purpose and registered claims of Asonor

 

Eur Respir J. 1988 Oct;1(9):785-91.

The effects of a mixture of surface-active agents (Sonarex) on upper airways resistance and snoring in anaesthetized dogs.

Widdicombe JG1, Davies A.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3229476

 

Upper airways resistance and snoring in anaesthetized dogs

JG Widdicombe, A Davies

European Respiratory Journal 1988 1: 779-784; DOI:

 

https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/1/9/779